© 2019 | (In)Justice for All Film Festival 

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The (In)Justice for All Film Festival was conceived as a project to pull together a consortium of social justice organizations, universities and colleges, and faith-based organizations, and use the power of film to educate our community and build the grass roots support needed to affect the systemic changes we require. To that end, in addition to screening films, we, along with our various partners, will be hosting several events to enrich our understanding of the issues and challenges associated with the mass incarceration epidemic. Mental Health, Drug Addiction and Abuse, Harsh Juvenile Sentencing, Three Strikes Laws, etc., are potential topics for workshops, panel discussions and forums.

 

Sign up for our mailing list, to be sure to be notified as events are finalized and posted here. 

 

2017 EVENTS

TIP: It is best to view the events below, choose your events, and then go through the RSVP process: limited detail is available at the registration/RSVP site.

All movie screenings are FREE!

Thursday, April 20th | 6pm – 7pm

Festival Opening Reception

 

Trinity UCC - Atrium

400 W. 95th Street, Chicago

Join us as the 4th Annual (In)Justice For All Film Festival kicks off with an opening reception as we pause for a few minutes to share our appreciation and celebrate all of the filmmakers, members of the festival team, our partner organizations from throughout Chicago, and our financial and media sponsors. These individuals and organizations are critical to our ability to hold this film festival, particularly at this scale, and we treasure their support. Light refreshments will be served.

 

Thursday, April 20th | 7pm – 9pm

Opening Ceremony

and screening of

INCARCERATING US

Director: Regan Hines

 

Trinity UCC – Sanctuary

400 W. 95th Street, Chicago

Immediately following our opening reception we will hold a short ceremony of welcome and celebration, and special recognition of Curley Cohen, a life-long activist for prisoner and human rights, and The Next Movement member who originally conceived of this film festival. Our opening night film, Incarcerating US, will serve to bring focus to our mission as it brings fundamental questions regarding our prison system to the fore: What is the purpose of prison? Why did our prison population explode in the 1970s? What can make our justice system more just? A panel of prison reform activists will provide context, immediately following the film.

 

Friday, April 21st | 6pm – 9pm

Chicago State University and The Next Movement present:

ARTISTS IN ABSENTIA | Director: Marc Kornblatt

STRAIGHT FROM THE PEN | Director: Paul Sutton

TURN THE PAGE | Director: Linda Moroney

 

Chicago State University

701 E. 95th Street, Chicago

Creativity, artistry, and relationship are common concepts explored within this group of films. Artists In Absentia follows the work of volunteers who help inmates at a Wisconsin minimum-security prison mount a multi-media exhibition at the state capital's central library, while Straight From The Pen takes us into a maximum-security southern California prison where an innovative creative writing class provides a new opportunity for open and honest expression. Finally, Turn The Page takes us to Ontario County Jail where a jail-based literacy program, Storybook, is providing connections between moms and dads, and their children left behind, through taped “Bedtime Stories.”

 

Friday, April 21st | 7pm – 8:30pm

Fellowship Christian Church presents:

34 DAYS: HUNGRY FOR JUSTICE | Director: Rachel Dickson

 

Fellowship Christian Church

1106-1110 Madison St., Oak Park

34 Days: Hungry For Justice is a short documentary about the hunger strikers that fought successfully to keep Walter J. Dyett High School from closing. As 50 schools were ordered closed by the administration of the Chicago Public Schools, 34 men and women went on a hunger strike to save Dyett They didn't get all they wanted, but they fought and won. A conversation will follow with some of the participants.

Saturday, April 22nd | 1pm - 3pm

The Next Movement presents:

FORGOTTEN SUNSET
Director: Alex Costello

THE RETURN
Directors: Kelly Duane La Vega & Katie Galloway

 

Trinity UCC – Sanctuary

400 W. 95th Street, Chicago

Forgotten Sunset explores the challenge of reconnection following a long prison term, as a father attempts to find a footing in his daughter’s life. More broadly, The Return examines the challenges experienced as California passed Proposition 36, which amended some of the most drastic “3 Strikes Laws,” resulting in the release, and necessary reintegration of thousands of former prisoners over a period of days.

 

Saturday, April 22nd | 1pm – 4pm

2017 Black Man's Expo presents:

BEYOND THE WALL

Directors: Jenny Phillips & Bestor Cram

 

Woodlawn Resource Center

6144 S. Cottage Grove, Chicago

What happens when inmates are released and return as citizens in our communities? Beyond The Wall explores the hardships, barriers, and challenges returning citizens face as they attempt to rebuild their lives with little to no support from our criminal justice system.

Saturday, April 22nd | 3:30pm – 5:30pm

The Next Movement presents a
SHORT FILM PROGRAM

BARZ NOBLE - CALL OF DUTY | Director: Verline Ewing

HOW IT SOUNDED TO SQUISH A COCKROACH (#SayHerName) | Director: Lisa Russell

SEKUNDENTAKT | Director: Shamila Lengsfed

MOTHER'S CRY | Director: Lisa Russell

THE ENDLESS RIVER | Director: Mohammad Mohammadian

THE MONEY SHOT | Director: Robert Lyons

HAPPY HOUR | Director: William J. Busby III

SAME FRUIT, DIFFERENT TREE | Director: Mansur K. Rashid

INNER ME | Director: Antonio Spanò

SPIN CYCLE | Director: Janeen O. Talbot

EST. 1896 | Director: Jazmin Corchado

THE OTHER SIDE | Director: Flora Namala

 

Trinity UCC - Chapel

400 W. 95th Street, Chicago

Over the years our Short Film Programs have been the source of some of the biggest laughs, huge gasps of shock, and incredible creativity. This year’s program embraces that legacy completely. Don’t miss this opportunity to see short films from around the world.

 

Saturday, April 22nd | 4pm – 6pm

The Trinity UCC LGTB Family Ministry presents:

HOLLER IF YOU HEAR ME: BLACK AND GAY IN THE CHURCH

Director: Clay Cane

 

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Academy of Social Justice

644 W. 71st Street, Chicago

Journalist Clay Cane explores homophobia in the black church with this groundbreaking BET.com documentary Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church. This film debut puts the narrative in the hands of Black LGBT people who are torn between their faith and sexuality. Through emotional and deeply honest storytelling, this film boldly tackles the intersections of race, gender, sexuality and religion. Filmed in Atlanta, Georgia, where church and LGBT culture cross paths like nowhere else, Cane unpacks this controversial but important issue, humanizing the journeys of those who struggle between these worlds.

Saturday, April 22nd | 6pm – 8pm

The Prison Ministry of Trinity UCC presents:

HALFWAY

Director: Ben Caird

 

Trinity UCC - Sanctuary

400 W. 95th Street, Chicago

This feature film stars Quinton Aaron (from The Blind Side) as a recently released offender who wrestles with ties from his criminal past as he struggles with life on probation in a small, conservative Wisconsin farming community.

 

Sunday, April 23rd | 1pm – 3pm

St. Stephens Lutheran Church presents:

SOUTH BUREAU HOMICIDE

Directors: Mike Cooley & Mark Earl Burman

 

St. Stephens Lutheran Church

8500 S. Maryland Ave., Chicago

The challenge of community/police relations has rarely been so urgent as it is today. South Bureau Homicide takes a look, from the inside, of how community residents and L.A. Police Department homicide detectives have worked to forge a productive relationship. Gain an understanding of how one model seems to be working, and stay to discuss how this may apply to the challenges we face in Chicago.

 

Sunday, April 23rd | 1pm – 2:30pm

Lincoln Memorial United Church of Christ presents:

BEYOND THE WALL

Directors: Jenny Phillips & Bestor Cram

 

Lincoln Memorial United Church of Christ

6454 S. Champlain Ave., Chicago

What happens when inmates are released and return as citizens in our communities? Beyond The Wall explores the hardships, barriers, and challenges returning citizens face as they attempt to rebuild their lives with little to no support from our criminal justice system.

 

Sunday, April 23rd | 3pm – 5pm

The Next Movement presents:

A Celebration of Chicago Filmmakers 

featuring:

ROBBEN ISLAND SINGERS
Director: Jeff Spitz

REVENGE OF EMMETT TILL
Director: Emmanuel Camacho & Dwamina K. Drew

34 DAYS: HUNGRY FOR JUSTICE
Director: Rachel Dickson

 

Trinity UCC - Chapel

400 W. 95th St., Chicago

This exciting program was designed to highlight wonderful projects from Chicago based filmmakers.

 

The Robben Island Singers originated from within the Robben Island Prison, in South Africa, where Nelson Mandela was held for nearly 30 years. The film documents the journey that brought Muntu Nxumalo, Thembinkosi Sithole, and Grant Shezi together and halfway around the world to Chicago. We will get to hear from the documentarian, Jeff Spitz, and see clips from the documentary still in development, including clips from their visit to Trinity United Church of Christ! The Revenge of Emmett Till chronicles Brother Till’s story through the eyewitness account of his cousin, Simeon Wright, highlighting the impact of his story through interviews, including with visual artist Hebru Brantley and Lupe Fiasco. Finally, 34 Days: Hungry For Justice is a short documentary about the hunger strikers that fought successfully to keep Walter J. Dyett High School from closing.

 

Monday, April 24th | 6pm – 9pm

Service Employees International Union – Healthcare presents:

A Global Exploration of Immigration

TRAILS OF HOPE AND TERROR | Director: Vincent De La Torre

THE AMERICAN DREAM| Director: Victor Rodriguez Urosa

NON – ASSISTANCE | Director: Frederic Choffat

 

SEIU – Healthcare

2229 S. Halsted St., Chicago

While immigration is a pressing issue within the United States, the fact is immigration is an immense global issue, an issue of life and death. We have seen the photographs and video of men, women and children risking everything to get across the Mediterranean Sea to Greece and Turkey, and other countries, as they flee various conflicts in North Africa. Non-Assistance is a powerful documentary that shows ordinary European citizens as they work, without government support, to help bring some humanity to this unprecedented crisis. In The American Dream, an immigrant goes to New York in search of a better life only to realize the reality of the American dream is not all he had expected. Now He has to choose between staying, and trying to make money for his family, or being present with his family. Finally, in Trails of Hope and Terror filmmakers traveled to the U.S. border five times to walk the desert and interview humanitarian groups, social workers, legal professionals, the undocumented, and anti-immigration protesters. Rather than simplistically scapegoating the immigrant, the documentary explores the historical events that contributed to the movements of Mexicans and Central Americans northward.

Monday, April 24th | 6:30pm – 8:30pm

The Columbia College Chicago Television Department and Cinema Art and Science Department, present:

BURMA: THE PATHS TO REINTEGRATION

Directors: Martin Huard & Vincent Giraldo

 

Columbia College

1104 S. Wabash, Chicago

In Burma, at least 10,000 people were imprisoned for fighting the military regime since the early 60s. In prison, they experienced torture and psychological abuse. Some activists have spent more than 20 years behind bars. In 2011, the junta handed over power to a civilian government. A presidential amnesty released hundreds of dissidents. Burma: The paths of Reintegration shows their painful return to society. The moving film shows the current lives of these activists who fought against the military junta and the problems they face : psychological disorders, poor health, exclusion.

 

Monday, April 24th | 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law and The Next Movement present:

THE LONG RIDE

Director: Valerie Lapin Ganley

 

Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law

Faculty Lounge

375 E Chicago Ave, Chicago

Alarmed by increasing workplace abuses, in 2003 more than 900 immigrants embarked on a cross country Immigrants Freedom Ride, inspired by the Civil Rights era Freedom Riders. The Long Ride chronicles their journey, as well as the ongoing fight for immigrant rights. With the current challenges of “the Wall,” travel restrictions, and increasingly aggressive immigrant detentions, etc., Northwestern Law attorneys and students have been at the forefront in providing legal assistance. To add context and provide ideas on how to help, we will have a panel including some of those frontline attorneys.

 

Monday, April 24th | 6:30pm – 8:30pm

South Side Projections, the Community Film Workshop of Chicago, and Reel Black Filmmakers present:

BLACK AND BLUE

Directors: Hugh King & Lamar Williams

 

Community Film Workshop

Harris Park Field House

6200 S. Drexel Ave., Chicago

Black and Blue is a powerful mix of archival material, news clips, and documentary footage that chronicles impassioned community response to decades of deadly force against people of color by members of the Philadelphia police force. Community leaders, politicians, police officers, survivors of police brutality, and sympathizers unravel a pattern of biased violent police behavior from the tenure of Police Commissioner Frank Rizzo to the bombing of MOVE headquarters. This documentary is a testimony to longstanding tensions between police and people of color in communities throughout the United States. To provide context, Mike Siviwe Elliott, a longtime labor and community activist and Labor Committee Chair of the Chicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression, and a leader in the fight for community control of the police, through a city ordinance that will establish an all-elected Civilian Police Accountability Council (CPAC), will participate in a panel conversation with others TBD.

 

Tuesday, April 25th | 11:30am – 1:30pm and 6pm - 8pm

Frederick Douglass Academy and The Next Movement present:

GANG GIRL: A MOTHER'S JOURNEY TO SAVE HER DAUGHTER

Director: Valerie Goodloe

 

Frederick Douglass Academy High School

543 N. Waller Street, Chicago

Valerie Goodloe, a LA-based professional photographer for a national magazine, thought that she and her family had it made. She imagined that her daughter would go to college, excel in her chosen career and never have to worry about issues fueled by poverty, such as being on welfare, selling drugs or using food stamps. That dream, however, became a nightmare when Goodloe discovered that her troubled daughter Nafeesa had joined the Bloods, a notorious Los Angeles gang. After many sleepless nights and court appearances with her daughter, Goodloe determined that not only did she need answers to help explain how she found herself on this path with Nafeesa, but that she would take it upon herself to increase awareness about the huge numbers of girls and women involved in the gang lifestyle. Join the filmmaker following the screening for a conversation about the issue of gang culture.

Tuesday, April 25th | 6:30pm – 8pm

United Church of Hyde Park presents:

MILWAUKEE 53206

Director: Keith McQuirter

 

United Church of Hyde Park

1448 E 53rd St., Chicago

53206 is the most incarcerated ZIP Code in America. Milwaukee 53206 chronicles the lives of those impacted by incarceration in this ZIP Code. Through the intimate stories of three 53206 residents, we witness the high toll mass incarceration takes on individuals and families that make up the community. The film not only examines 53206, but also illuminates the story of people from across the United States who live with the daily effects of mass incarceration. A panel discussion will immediately follow the screening.

 

Tuesday, April 25th | 6:30pm – 8:30pm

4th Presbyterian Church presents:

WALK WITH ME

Produced by The Church of Gethsemane, NY

FAITH IN THE BIG HOUSE

Director: Jonathan Schwartz

 

4TH Presbyterian Church

126 E. Chestnut St., Chicago

Faith plays such an important role in the growth of men and women who are incarcerated, providing them with a stable platform with which to build their lives, both during their prison stays, and critically upon their release. These films explore various ways the church impacts the lives of current and former inmates, and the “formulas” used by Christian missionaries to convert prisoners. Faith in the Big House also explores secular and faith-based re-entry programs, and their effectiveness in preventing recidivism.

 

Tuesday, April 25th | 6:30pm – 9pm

The Columbia College Chicago Television Department and Cinema Art and Science Department, present:

RAISING BERTIE

Director: Margaret Byrne

 

Columbia College

1104 S. Wabash, Chicago

Set in Bertie County, a rural African American-led community in Eastern North Carolina, Raising Bertie takes audiences deep into the emotional lives of three boys – Reginald “Junior” Askew, David “Bud” Perry, and Davonte “Dada” Harrell – over six-years as they come of age. This powerful vérité film produced by Chicago’s internationally acclaimed Kartemquin Films (Hoop Dreams, The Interrupters), Raising Bertie movingly weaves the young men’s stories together as they try to define their identities, interconnecting narratives of family, youthful innocence, first love, systemic racism, educational inequity, poverty and unemployment, and the will to succeed in the face of formidable odds. The filmmakers will be on hand to discuss this project with the audience.

 

Wednesday, April 26th | 6pm – 8:30pm

The Mansfield Institute for Social Justice and Transformation, and The Next Movement present:

ALL IT TAKES
Directors: Jake Hochendoner & Drew Dickler

GETTING HIGH

Director: Victor Silverman

 

Roosevelt University

430 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago

Wabash Room 612

As the use of opioids as pain medications has exploded, so too has the rate of addiction to both pharmaceutical meds and street drugs. All It Takes explores the opiate epidemic in Lorain County, Ohio from the point of view of addicts and through the efforts of those who strive to help them recover their lives and their dignity. Getting High is a personal examination of the roots of the War on Drugs exploring one family’s collision with drugs, alcohol and the law.  A panel will discuss the films, and more importantly, the current battle to move society from criminalizing addiction to treating drug addiction as a health issue.

 

Wednesday, April 26th | 6:30pm

The Next Movement and Off The Pews, in partnership with The Community TV Network, and Free Spirit Media, present:

YOUNG FILMMAKERS FOR JUSTICE

TO SERVE AND PROTECT? | Ghandi Youth Brigade

THIS IS NOT THE END | The Community TV Network

CREATIVE CONTROL | Free Spirit Media

MARQUIS | Youth FX

GENERATION REVOLUTION | Co-Directors: Ysayd Younis & Cassie Quarless

 

Chicago Cultural Center

78 E. Washington St., Chicago

IFAFF's Young Filmmakers for Justice program offers the work of young artists committed to social justice. 2017's selections are products of young filmmaker media programs in Albany NY, Silver Springs, MD and Chicago's Lawndale, Grand Crossing and Humboldt Park neighborhoods. These film programs will kick off the event.  We will then be fired up by young Chicago poet Kwynn Riley, who will present a couple of pieces, and then will close the evening with a screening of Generation Revolution, a powerful documentary, by millennial filmmakers Ysayd Younis and Cassie Quarless, that introduces us to the Black Lives Matter movement in England. Following the films we will have a panel discussion with young activists from the Chicago area.

 

Thursday, April 27th | 6pm – 9pm

The Next Movement invites you to a

CELEBRATION OF THE

AFRO-AMERICAN PATROLMAN’S LEAGUE

as we present:

DISPATCHES FROM CLEVELAND | Director: Catherine Gund

STATE OF FEAR: MURDER AND MEMORY ON BLACK WALL STREET | Director: J. D. Thompson

 

South Shore Cultural Center

7059 S. South Shore Dr., Chicago

Join us as we celebrate the men and women officers of the Afro-American Patrolman’s League! This group of African American police officers was among the first in the nation to declare that community came first, and to stand up to the racism within the very organization within which they worked. Brave, steadfast, and persistent, they represent a model for our police officers of today. We will feature two films that look at the issue of police misconduct and the deleterious effect it has on communities. Dispatches from Cleveland considers ordinary Clevelanders, shaken by police misconduct, discrimination and poverty, and their work to bring about real change in one of American’s most racially divided cities. Meanwhile, State of Fear juxtaposes the Tulsa, OK destruction of Black Wall Street by the Ku Klux Klan with a modern corrupt Tulsa County Sheriff’s department, with officers eventually convicted (including Tulsa County Sheriff, Stanley Glanz) in citizen deaths, rape of an underage girl, civil rights abuses and other offenses. The screenings will be followed by an intergenerational conversation with retired and current police officers/sheriffs. Refreshments will be served.

 

Thursday, April 27th | 6:30pm-9:30pm

Lake Forest College and The Next Movement present:

THE AMERICAN DREAM | Director: Victor Rodriguez Urosa

TRAILS OF HOPE AND TERROR | Director: Vincent De La Torre

 

Lake Forest College—Middle Campus

Meyer Auditorium, Hotchkiss Hall 

555 N Sheridan Road (at College Road), Lake Forest

An immigrant goes to New York in search of a better life only to realize the reality of the American dream is not all he had expected. Now he has to choose between staying and trying to make money for his family, or being present with his family. In Trails of Hope and Terror the question of America’s immigration dilemma is explored from an academic and scholarly manner, while maintaining accessibility for the viewer. Filmmakers traveled to the U.S. border five times to walk the desert and interview humanitarian groups, social workers, legal professionals, the undocumented, and anti-immigration protesters. Rather than simplistically scapegoating the immigrant, the documentary explores the historical events that contributed to the movements of Mexicans and Central Americans northward.

 

Thursday, April 27th | 6:30pm-9:30pm

Art Works Projects for Human Rights presents:

MY FATHER'S LAND

Director: Miquel Galofre

Art Works Projects for Human Rights

625 N. Kingsbury, Chicago

Papa Jah, a humble gardener, has lived in the Bahamas for 40 years. This film documents his return to Haiti to see his 103 years old father, and reunite with the land he left. A conversation will follow the film with a special guest.

Friday, April 28th | 3:00pm - 4:30pm

The Next Movement presents:

DISPATCHES FROM CLEVELAND

Director: Catherine Gund

 

Mills Park Tower

1025 Pleasant Pl., Oak Park

This insightful documentary is presented in 5 chapters, focused on ordinary Clevelanders who have been long shaken by police misconduct, social discrimination, and poverty. Depicting intersecting movements in Cleveland, the series examines how residents' love for their hometown pushes them to work together to bring about real change in one of the most racially divided cities in America.

 

Friday, April 28th | 6pm – 8pm

2017 Black Man's Expo presents:

SOUTH BUREAU HOMICIDE

Directors: Mike Cooley & Mark Earl Burman.

 

Woodlawn Resource Center

6144 S. Cottage Grove, Chicago

The challenge of community/police relations has rarely been so urgent as it is today. South Bureau Homicide takes a look, from the inside, of how community residents and L.A. Police Department homicide detectives have worked to forge a productive relationship. Gain an understanding of how one model seems to be working, and stay to discuss how this may apply to the challenges we face in Chicago

Friday, April 28th | 6:30pm – 8pm

Chicago State University and The Next Movement present:

SAVING BARBARA SIZEMORE

Director: David Jay Steiner

 

Chicago State University

701 E. 95th Street, Chicago

Black Schools Matter, especially Afri-centric schools that serve under-privileged black communities. The Barbara A. Sizemore Academy (BASA) is an Afri-centric charter in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago that the Chicago Public School District targeted for closure in November 2015. Little did they know that a small group of 7th and 8th grade filmmakers, and their teacher, were not going to stand for it. Come to see this exciting film of community empowerment, and stay to hear from an excellent panel of experts on the value of culturally connected education.

 

Friday, April 28th | 6:30pm – 8pm

Euclid Avenue United Methodist Church presents:

WHAT HAPPENED IN VEGAS

Director: Ramsey Denison

 

Euclid Avenue United Methodist Church

405 S. Euclid Ave, Oak Park

The advent of dashboard video and body cameras has revealed a reality that communities have known for decades; police officers hold the power of life a death in their hands, and they often use that power to the detriment of the communities they serve. What Happened in Vegas is a searing examination of out-of-control police, and abuse of power.

 

Friday, April 28th | 7pm – 8:30pm

Uri-Eichen Gallery presents:

IF WALLS COULD TALK: AN EXAMINATION OF THE SANDTOWN MURAL PROJECT

Director: Julian Hamer

 

Uri-Eichen Gallery

2101 S. Halsted St., Chicago

Following the unrest and uprising in Baltimore, with the death of Freddy Gray in police custody a mural project was initiated by curators Ernest Shaw and Nether. The Sandtown Mural Project and its impact on the Sandtown-Winchester community are explored in this wonderful documentary.

 

Friday, April 28th | 7pm - 8:30pm

1st Baptist Church of University Park presents:

MILWAUKEE 53206

Director: Keith McQuirter

 

1ST Baptist Church of University Park

450 University Pkwy, University Park

53206 is the most incarcerated ZIP Code in America. Milwaukee 53206 chronicles the lives of those impacted by incarceration in this ZIP Code. Through the intimate stories of three 53206 residents, we witness the high toll mass incarceration takes on individuals and families that make up the community. The film not only examines 53206, but also illuminates the story of people from across the United States who live with the daily effects of mass incarceration. A panel discussion will immediately follow the screening.

 

Saturday, April 29th | 11am – 12:30am

OFF THE RECORD: JUSTICE DENIED TO CHILD SEX ABUSE SURVIVORS | Director: Valerie Gibson

THE BENNO TAPES | Director: Tom van Zantvoort

Trinity UCC - Chapel

400 W. 95th Street, Chicago

For two films that cover the same core area – sex abuse – they couldn’t possibly come from such disparate directions. Off The Record explores the behind-the-scenes dealings that abuse survivors struggle with as they seek justice and recovery. The Benno Tapes follows a former swimming teacher, convicted of child abuse, as he is released on probation into a country where he is universally scorned, and struggles to survive.

Saturday, April 29th | 1pm – 2pm

The Next Movement, Moms Against Violence and Incarceration and Cabrini Green Legal Aid present:

ANGELS IN THE HOOD

Director: Damian Postell

 

Trinity UCC - Sanctuary

400 W. 95th Street, Chicago

When the average person is home, in a city where gun violence is rampant and loved ones are being shot and killed on a daily basis, Dawn Valenti is out there seeking answers for the mothers, the families and community. The filmmaker, Damian Postell, and many of the mothers in the film will be at this screening for a community conversation. 

 

Saturday, April 29th | 2:15pm – 4:15pm

Trinity UCC Intonjane Ministry presents:

GANG GIRL: A MOTHER'S JOURNEY TO SAVE HER DAUGHTER

Director: Valerie Goodloe

 

Trinity UCC - Chapel

400 W. 95th Street, Chicago

Valerie Goodloe, a LA-based professional photographer for a national magazine, thought that she and her family had it made. She imagined that her daughter would go to college, excel in her chosen career and never have to worry about issues fueled by poverty, such as being on welfare, selling drugs or using food stamps. That dream, however, became a nightmare when Goodloe discovered that her troubled daughter Nafeesa had joined the Bloods, a notorious Los Angeles gang. After many sleepless nights and court appearances with her daughter, Goodloe determined that not only did she need answers to help explain how she found herself on this path with Nafeesa, but that she would take it upon herself to increase awareness about the huge numbers of girls and women involved in the gang lifestyle. Join the filmmaker following the screening for a conversation about the issue of gang culture.

 

Saturday, April 29th | 4:30pm - 5pm

CLOSING RECEPTION

 

Trinity UCC – Fellowship Hall

400 W. 95th Street, Chicago

Join us for a snack as we unwind following another incredible festival! Light refreshments will be served.

Saturday, April 29th | 5pm - 6:30pm

CLOSING CEREMONY/AWARDS CEREMONY


Trinity UCC - Sanctuary

400 W. 95th Street, Chicago

Immediately following the reception, please join us for the 4th Annual (In)Justice For All Film Festival Awards Ceremony, as we will celebrate 10 days of wonderful films, and expert and filmmaker discussions. We will present our Justice Award winners - the top three films considering production quality, thematic relevance and justice impact – and festival awards for the top three short films, animation, narrative or documentary and the top three feature length films, narrative or documentary, as well as our Fan Favorite Award. We look forward to seeing you there!